Thermal Spray

Summary

  • 157 Companies
  • 181 Patents
  • 84 Use Cases
  • 10 Case Studies
  • 717 Science Papers
  • $4 198 821 Total Funding

Companies

#Organisation NameIndustriesHeadquarterDescriptionFounded YearCompany TypeNum of Employees
1
-
Roncello, MB
In 1969 Flame Spray was established as the first Italian job shop to actively promote Thermal Spray coating technologies and activities. Today it is an international benchmark for applications in these markets: Energy, Oil & Gas, Printing, Steel, Transport, Aerospace. Beyond Thermal Spray, Diffusion coatings, Slurry coatings, Cladding and Welding are today commonly applied processes at Flame Spray. The Company’s well established know how is developed daily in the research and production center of Roncello (Italy) and also in the excellence production sites of Montefino (Italy), Morra De Sanctis (AV), Szada (Hungary), Varazdin (Croatia) and Fountain Inn, SC (USA).
1969
Privately Held
142
2
Machinery
Grand Rapids, Michigan
Since 1967, Progressive has been a global leader in automated surface treatment machinery and closed-loop process controls for: • shot peening • grit blasting • thermal spray coating • ultra-high pressure waterjet cleaning At Progressive Surface®, our ProciseProcess® is your guarantee of success. We apply the Procise Process® to the design, manufacture, and servicing of custom and standard solutions for demanding industries such as: • aerospace • energy • medical • military • general manufacturing Progressive Surface® has installed more than 1,300 machines in more than 33 countries. Manufacturing takes place at Progressive Surface's 100,000+ sq ft headquarters in Grand Rapids, Michigan.
1968
Privately Held
97
3
Machinery
Saint Joseph, MI
More durable. Longer running. That's what you can expect from every custom-formulated rubber or polyurethane roll cover Vail manufactures. Yes, our innovative Technical Services team custom-formulates every roll cover for your metal, paper or industrial application. Our thermal spray coatings and in-house roll mechanical services optimize performance with every roll refurbishment and core repair. With more than 100 years experience building rolls for the toughest environments one thing is clear — there are no off-the-shelf solutions for operations serious about lowering costs, increasing productivity and surpassing their competition.
1892
Privately Held
64
4
Engineering
Dubai
With its roots in Dubai, Trinity Holdings has evolved into a leading provider of engineering solutions in the Middle East over the past 30 years. The group has kept pace with ever changing market dynamics by expanding its product & service range, thereby establishing itself as a one stop shop for all engineering needs. Listed below are the companies that comprise the group. Trinity Engineering Services LLC - MEP Contractors Trinity Mechanical Services - Total Mechanical Engineering Solutions Rainbow Mechanical Solutions LLC - Advanced surface technologies and thermal spray processes Trinity Hydraulic Projects LLC & Rainbow Mechanical Solutions LLC (Hose Division) - Hydraulic Hoses, Fittings Repair and Servicing Blue Light Industry LLC - Foundry & Electroplating Diesel Marine International LLC - Diesel Engine Reconditioning Arametal Oilfield Equipment Industry LLC - A supplier of premium steel products to the oil and gas sector in the Middle East Zirkoon General Trading LLC - Steel General Trading Advanced Pumps & Fire Safety Trading - Authorized Distributors for SAER Pumps in Middle East Oasis Pumps Industry LLC - Dewatering Pumps Manufacture & Dewatering Services Middle East Metal Can LLC - Metal Can Manufacturing Trinity Industrial Services WLL Trinity Engineering Services LLC - Muscat
1982
Privately Held
228
5
Machinery
Jonesboro, AR
Industrial dust collectors, mist collectors and fume collection equipment to clean up manufacturing processes such as blasting, chemical processing, fiberglass and FRP production, laser cutting, plasma cutting, mining, paper scrap, pharmaceutical, rubber grinding, seed processing, thermal spray, welding, woodworking, machining and more. Camfil APC is a division of Camfil, headquartered in Trosa, Sweden and is a worldwide air filtration company. Camfil has filtration divisions that specialize in HVAC filters, HEPA filters, cleanrooms, gas turbine intake filtration, hospital filtration, railroad locomotive filters and carbon odor filters.
-
Privately Held
192
6
Oil and Energy
Muscat
Advanced Oilfield Technology Company LLC (AOTC) is a leading Repair & Maintenance Company Specialized in Reverse Engineering, Thermal Spray Technology, Rig Equipment Overhauling, Efficiency Enhancement Projects, Repair and Maintenance for various equipment's from sectors like Oil & Gas , Refineries, Petrochemicals, Power, Defense, Steel, Cement, Marine and various others. AOTC has a full-fledged facility of 15,000 m2 in Rusayl Industrial Estate for Manufacturing, Re-manufacturing, Repair & Maintenance Services. Further 20,000 m2 facility development is in progress at Rusayl. The company is deeply rooted in Oman and is committed towards developing the local industry and continually improving the quality and technology of its business. AOTC is certified with ISO 9001:2015 and API 5CT, API 6A & 6D & API 7-1 monogramming licenses. AOTC is also an active member of EASA, AEMT & ANSI. AOTC’s Major Services : 1.Machining & Surface Engineering Services. 2.Specialized Mechanical Services. 3.Valves & Well Control Solution. 4.Corrosion Engineering Services. 5.Electrical Motor Services. 6.Onsite Services. 7.Electrical & Instrumentation Services. 8.O&M Shutdown Services. A Brief about AOTC’s major services : 1.MSE ( Machining & Surface Engineering Services ) : AOTC initiated with machine shop in the year 2000 with few conventional lathes & today we are one of the leading Machine Shop in Sultanate of OMAN. Also we are able to highlight our-self in the global map under the approved list of workshop for Schlumberger globally. The MSE division has broad range of state-of-the-art machine tools and machinaries capable of various specialized services such as Thermal Spraying - ARC Spray & HVOF ; Precision Machining ; Heavy Duty Machining ; Reverse Engineering ; Complex Machining ; Refurbishment of Downhole tools as per API 5CT & API 7-1. , Dynamic Balancing up to 16 tons............. Do visit out website for more details about the ONE STOP SOLUTION !! PROVIDER .
2000
Privately Held
170
7
Oil and Energy
Dubai Investment Park -1, Dubai
Aswan International Engineering (AIE) was established in Dubai in 1979. Aswan is a "one stop facility"​ for repair and manufacturing of mechanical components for the oil, marine and heavy industries. Aswan is a part of Al Shirawi Group (www.alshirawi.com), a one of the largest and diversified conglomerates in the Middle East and Africa. AIE's reputation extends beyond the shores of UAE and its expertise is recognised internationally. Today, the company is an acclaimed global solution provider whose technical excellence and customer service ranks among the best. Located in Dubai Investments Park, Aswan has a state of the art 250,000 square foot facility with CNC precision machining, reliable thermal spray coatings, advanced electroplating and specialized welding. it has an employee strength of 200 people with the certification for IS0 9001:2015, IS0 14001:2015 and ISO 45001:2018. Web site: www.aswan.com
1979
Privately Held
160
8
Chemicals
Tualatin, Oregon
Fujimi is a global leader in lapping, abrasive, and polishing materials. We actively have products spanning various industries and are heavily utilized in the supply chain of semiconductor manufacturing organizations worldwide. Our array of products iniclude abrasive powders and slurries, CMP slurries, grinding and polishing supplies and CERMET thermal spray materials to name a few. In addition to our products, we have manufacturing facilities setup for applying some of our core competencies and technologies, including classification and separation of particles by particle size, mixing, and blending. Our highly qualified and experienced staff is capable of supporting you and your organization in applying our products and technology in your processes.
1984
Privately Held
142
9
Aviation and Aerospace
Rubbiano di Solignano, Parma
Lincotek Surface Solutions has the knowledge and experience of being in the thermal spray industry for over forty years. The company has dedicated itself to continuous advancement in research, development, innovation and manufacturing techniques. Today, Lincotek Surface Solutions is based in four places: one in North America (NC) and three in Europe (Italy, France, Switzerland), offering coating and post-coating treatments for OEM land based gas turbine and aircraft engines. With the ability to provide a wide range of thermal spray processes and related services so as to help you with the best selection of surface technology that best meets your needs. Including in house post-machining services which allow us to deliver your tested products ready to engine. Our committed and experienced people will dedicate themselves to gain your utmost satisfaction. The commitment and philosophy for quality has earned the company numerous OEM approvals, in compliance with EN/AS 9100 as well as ISO 14001 certifications, GTS and NADCAP.
1999
Privately Held
123
10
Construction
Abu Dhabi
Intherpro LLC is the International Company for Thermal Insulation and Passive Fire Protection. As a group, we are leaders in performing quality services as per ISO 9001 ‑ 2000. Intherpro LLC is established in U.A.E. with offices in Abu Dhabi and Dubai, and warehouse facilities in Sharjah DIP and Mussafah. We have been in the insulation field since 1969 and in the fire protection since 1971. Since that time we have performed several jobs covering all aspects of insulation such as : * Hot & Cold insulation * Cryogenic insulation * Thermal spray insulation * Acoustical insulation * Sound insulation Aspects of fireproofing are : * Fire resistant coating for fire rated ductworks * Cementitious spray application on structural steel and concrete * Intumescent paint application on steel structure * Fire stopping by sealing penetration * Light weight fire rated wall system. * Fire barriers * Fire doors
1969
Public Company
89

Patents

#NumberTitleAbstractDateKindAssigneeInventor
1
10 982 310
Corrosion resistant thermal spray alloy
The present disclosure provides a thermal spray alloy system that is more resistant to corrosion than conventional alloy compositions. The disclosed alloy comprises copper as the main component and also potentially nickel, tin, boron, and/or carbon as other principle elements. The alloy composition may utilize a cored wire, and an outer sheath of the cored wire may comprise unalloyed copper. The alloy has superior corrosion resistance to a wide number of corrosive materials, such as hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide/carbonic acid, sodium chloride/potassium chloride (salts), bio-fouling, and micro-biologicals. The alloy demonstrates superior thermal conductivity compared to nickel based alloys and stainless steels. The alloy may form an anti-corrosive coating that may be applied to any number of substrates. The disclosed alloy may be applied to a substrate in thick layers, such as between 0.100 inches and 3.0 inches, and may be used to form shapes, such as centralizers.
B2
ResOps, LLC
Hai Nguyen, Joe L. Scott
2
10 851 449
Thermal spray slurry
Provided is thermal spray slurry capable of forming a dense coating by thermal spraying while suppressing cracks. Thermal spray slurry includes: thermal spray particles having an average particle diameter of 1 μm or more and 10 μm or less and a dispersion medium in which the thermal spray particles are dispersed, and has a filling rate of 84 mass % or less, the filling rate being calculated by the following expression, filling rate (mass %)=B/A×100,
B2
FUJIMI INCORPORATED
Takaya Masuda, Hiroyuki Ibe, Kazuya Sugimura
3
10 801 097
Thermal spray coatings onto non-smooth surfaces
This invention relates to thermal spray coatings and processes onto non-smooth surfaces. The coating and processes can coat non-smooth surfaces without substantial degradation of the underlying surface texture or profile of the non-smooth surfaces so as to sufficiently preserve the underlying surface texture or profile. The ability for coating fractional coverage to maintain the surface profile while maintaining wear resistance is unprecedented by conventional thermal spray processes.
B2
Praxair S.T. Technology, Inc.
Daming Wang, Ardy Kleyman, Michael S Brennan
4
10 775 115
Thermal spray coating method and thermal spray coated article
Thermal spray coating methods and thermal spray coated articles are disclosed. The thermal spray coating method includes positioning a covering on a cooling channel of a component, and thermal spraying a feedstock onto the covering. The covering prohibits the feedstock from entering the cooling channel in the component and is not removed from the component. In another embodiment, the thermal spray coating method includes providing a component comprising a substrate material, providing a cooling channel on a surface of the component, positioning a covering on the cooling channel, and thermal spraying a feedstock onto the component and the covering, the feedstock comprising a bond coat material. The covering prohibits the bond coat material from entering the cooling channel. The thermal spray coated article includes a component, a cooling channel, a covering on the cooling channel, and a thermally sprayed coating on the component and the covering.
B2
GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
Jon Conrad Schaeffer
5
10 766 822
Thermal spray material and thermal spray coated article
Provided is a thermal spray material that can form a compact thermal sprayed coating having an enhanced plasma erosion resistance. The herein disclosed art provides a thermal spray material that contains a rare earth element (RE), oxygen (O), and a halogen element (X) as constituent elements and that contains a mixed crystal of a rare earth element oxyhalide (RE-O—X) and a rare earth element halide (REX3).
B2
TOKYO ELECTRON LIMITED, FUJIMI INCORPORATED
Hiroyuki Ibe, Takaya Masuda, Nobuyuki Nagayama
6
10 730 063
Plasma transfer wire arc thermal spray system
In one or more embodiments, the invention relates to a plasma transfer wire arc thermal spray system, comprising a section for feeding a wire acting as a first electrode, a source of plasma gas providing plasma gas, a nozzle directing the plasma gas stream from the source of plasma gas to a free end of the wire, and a second electrode located in the plasma gas stream towards the nozzle. In certain instances, the nozzle is made at least partially of electrically insulating material. The thermal spray apparatus with the inventive spray gun may have a simplified and faster starting procedure and the spray nozzle can be more durable.
B2
FORD GLOBAL TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
Leander Schramm, Alexander Schwenk, Enrico Hauser
7
10 724 999
Thermal spray diagnostics
An example system includes at least one acoustic sensor configured to generate at least one time-dependent acoustic data signal indicative of an acoustic signal generated by a thermal spray system performing a process possessing a plurality of process attributes, and a computing device including an acoustic data signal processing module configured to receive the at least one time-dependent acoustic data signal, and transform the at least one time-dependent acoustic data signal to a frequency-domain spectrum, wherein each process attribute of the plurality of process attributes is associated with at least one respective frequency band, and a correlation module configured to determine a process attribute of the plurality of process attributes by identifying at least one characteristic of the frequency-domain spectrum.
B2
Rolls-Royce Corporation
Romesh Batra, Matthew R. Gold, Taylor K. Blair, Raymond J. Sinatra, Michael Cybulsky, Gary Pickrell
8
10 721 813
Arrangement and process for thermal spray coating vehicle components with solid lubricants
An arrangement (40) and process for coating a vehicle component (30) with a solid lubricant including a thermal spray device (10) having a spray direction along a spray line (S) corresponding to a central axis of a spray plume (16); a solid lubricant injection device (20) having an injection direction along an injection line (L) corresponding to a central axis of an injection plume (24); and a vehicle component (30) to be coated, having a surface (31) arranged at a distance (d) from an outlet orifice (13) of the thermal spray device (10) along the spray line (S). The solid lubricant injection device (20) is positioned such that the injection line (L) intersects the spray line (S) at an intersection point (P), which is intermediate the outlet orifice (13) of the thermal spray device (10) and the surface (31) of the component (30) to be coated. Also a process for thermal spray coating a vehicle component (30) with a solid lubricant coating and a vehicle, with such a coated component.
B2
SCANIA CV AB
Jessica Elfsberg
9
10 683 808
Sliding contact wear surfaces coated with PTFE/aluminum oxide thermal spray coating
A method of applying a wear-resistant coating to aluminum sliding contact wear surfaces is disclosed. The method includes providing a plurality of parts having sliding contact wear surfaces and thermal spray coating at least one of a composite aluminum oxide and PTFE or a blend of aluminum oxide and PTFE. The disclosed method may be used to repair aluminum parts subject to sliding contact wear as well as in the design of new aluminum parts subject to sliding contact wear. Improved compressor bleed valves for gas turbine engines and improved fan exit case assemblies are also disclosed.
B2
RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION
William Bogue, Timothy J. Tabor
10
10 612 120
Thermal spray slurry and method of forming thermal sprayed coating
To provide thermal spray slurry capable of forming a thermal sprayed coating having a high adhesion strength on a thermal spray target surface of a substrate, disclosed is thermal spray slurry for forming a thermal sprayed coating on the thermal spray target surface by spraying the thermal spray slurry on the thermal spray target surface of the substrate, the thermal spray slurry containing: thermal spray particles having a 50% particle diameter D50 equal to or larger than 1 μm and equal to or smaller than 5 μm in volume-based cumulative particle diameter distribution; and a dispersion medium in which the thermal spray particles are dispersed. In addition, a ratio D10/Ra between a surface roughness Ra (unit: μm) of the thermal spray target surface and a 10% particle diameter D10 (unit: μm) of the thermal spray particles in the volume-based cumulative particle diameter distribution satisfies a formula “0.4
B2
FUJIMI INCORPORATED
Hiroyuki Ibe, Kazuya Sugimura, Takaya Masuda

Patents by Year

Inventors

Assignees

Assignees

Science

Data limited by 2021

Top 10 cited papers

#Paper TitlePaper AbstractAuthorsFields of StudyYearCitation Count
1
The Science and Engineering of Thermal Spray Coatings
Preface to the Second Edition. Preface to the First Edition. Acronyms, Abbreviations and Symbols. 1 Materials Used for Spraying. 1.1 Methods of Powders Production. 1.1.1 Atomization. 1.1.2 Sintering or Fusion. 1.1.3 Spray Drying (Agglomeration). 1.1.4 Cladding. 1.1.5 Mechanical Alloying (Mechanofusion). 1.1.6 Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS). 1.1.7 Other Methods. 1.2 Methods of Powders Characterization. 1.2.1 Grain Size. 1.2.2 Chemical and Phase Composition. 1.2.3 Internal and External Morphology. 1.2.4 High-temperature Behaviour. 1.2.5 Apparent Density and Flowability. 1.3 Feeding, Transport and Injection of Powders. 1.3.1 Powder Feeders. 1.3.2 Transport of Powders. 1.3.3 Injection of Powders. References. 2 Pre-Spray Treatment. 2.1 Introduction. 2.2 Surface Cleaning. 2.3 Substrate Shaping. 2.4 Surface Activation. 2.5 Masking. References. 3 Thermal Spraying Techniques. 3.1 Introduction. 3.2 Flame Spraying (FS). 3.2.1 History. 3.2.2 Principles. 3.2.3 Process Parameters. 3.2.4 Coating Properties. 3.3 Atmospheric Plasma Spraying (APS). 3.3.1 History. 3.3.2 Principles. 3.3.3 Process Parameters. 3.3.4 Coating Properties. 3.4 Arc Spraying (AS). 3.4.1 Principles. 3.4.2 Process Parameters. 3.4.3 Coating Properties. 3.5 Detonation-Gun Spraying (D-GUN). 3.5.1 History. 3.5.2 Principles. 3.5.3 Process Parameters. 3.5.4 Coating Properties. 3.6 High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) Spraying. 3.6.1 History. 3.6.2 Principles. 3.6.3 Process Parameters. 3.6.4 Coating Properties. 3.7 Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS). 3.7.1 History. 3.7.2 Principles. 3.7.3 Process Parameters. 3.7.4 Coating Properties. 3.8 Controlled-Atmosphere Plasma Spraying (CAPS). 3.8.1 History. 3.8.2 Principles. 3.8.3 Process Parameters. 3.8.4 Coating Properties. 3.9 Cold-Gas Spraying Method (CGSM). 3.9.1 History. 3.9.2 Principles. 3.9.3 Process Parameters. 3.9.4 Coating Properties. 3.10 New Developments in Thermal Spray Techniques. References. 4 Post-Spray Treatment. 4.1 Heat Treatment. 4.1.1 Electromagnetic Treatment. 4.1.2 Furnace Treatment. 4.1.3 Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). 4.1.4 Combustion Flame Re-melting. 4.2 Impregnation. 4.2.1 Inorganic Sealants. 4.2.2 Organic Sealants. 4.3 Finishing. 4.3.1 Grinding. 4.3.2 Polishing and Lapping. References. 5 Physics and Chemistry of Thermal Spraying. 5.1 Jets and Flames. 5.1.1 Properties of Jets and Flames. 5.2 Momentum Transfer between Jets or Flames and Sprayed Particles. 5.2.1 Theoretical Description. 5.2.2 Experimental Determination of Sprayed Particles' Velocities. 5.2.3 Examples of Experimental Determination of Particles Velocities. 5.3 Heat Transfer between Jets or Flames and Sprayed Particles. 5.3.1 Theoretical Description. 5.3.2 Methods of Particles' Temperature Measurements. 5.4 Chemical Modification at Flight of Sprayed Particles. References. 6 Coating Build-Up. 6.1 Impact of Particles. 6.1.1 Particle Deformation. 6.1.2 Particle Temperature at Impact. 6.1.3 Nucleation, Solidification and Crystal Growth. 6.1.4 Mechanisms of Adhesion. 6.2 Coating Growth. 6.2.1 Mechanism of Coating Growth. 6.2.2 Temperature of Coatings at Spraying. 6.2.3 Generation of Thermal Stresses at Spraying. 6.2.4 Coatings Surfaces. 6.3 Microstructure of the Coatings. 6.3.1 Crystal Phase Composition. 6.3.2 Coatings' Inhomogeneity. 6.3.3 Final Microstructure of Sprayed Coatings. 6.4 Thermally Sprayed Composites. 6.4.1 Classification of Sprayed Composites. 6.4.2 Composite Coating Manufacturing. References. 7 Methods of Coatings' Characterization. 7.1 Methods of Microstructure Characterization. 7.1.1 Methods of Chemical Analysis. 7.1.2 Crystallographic Analyses. 7.1.3 Microstructure Analyses. 7.1.4 Other Applied Methods. 7.2 Mechanical Properties of Coatings. 7.2.1 Adhesion Determination. 7.2.2 Hardness and Microhardness. 7.2.3 Elastic Moduli, Strength and Ductility. 7.2.4 Properties Related to Mechanics of Coating Fracture. 7.2.5 Friction and Wear. 7.2.6 Residual Stresses. 7.3 Physical Properties of Coatings. 7.3.1 Thickness, Porosity and Density. 7.3.2 Thermophysical Properties. 7.3.3 Thermal Shock Resistance. 7.4 Electrical Properties of Coatings. 7.4.1 Electrical Conductivity. 7.4.2 Properties of Dielectrics. 7.4.3 Electron Emission from Surfaces. 7.5 Magnetic Properties of Coatings. 7.6 Chemical Properties of Coatings. 7.6.1 Aqueous Corrosion. 7.6.2 Hot-gas Corrosion. 7.7 Characterization of Coatings' Quality. 7.7.1 Acoustical Methods. 7.7.2 Thermal Methods. References. 8 Properties of Coatings. 8.1 Design of Experiments. 8.2 Mechanical Properties. 8.2.1 Hardness and Microhardness. 8.2.2 Tensile Adhesion Strength. 8.2.3 Elastic Moduli, Strengths and Fracture Toughness. 8.2.4 Friction and Wear. 8.3 Thermophysical Properties. 8.3.1 Thermal Conductivity and Diffusivity. 8.3.2 Specific Heat. 8.3.3 Thermal Expansion. 8.3.4 Emissivity. 8.3.5 Thermal Shock Resistance. 8.4 Electric Properties. 8.4.1 Properties of Conductors. 8.4.2 Properties of Resistors. 8.4.3 Properties of Dielectrics. 8.4.4 Electric Field Emitters. 8.4.5 Properties of Superconductors. 8.5 Magnetic Properties. 8.5.1 Soft Magnets. 8.5.2 Hard Magnets. 8.6 Optical Properties. 8.6.1 Decorative Coatings. 8.6.2 Optically Functional Coatings. 8.7 Corrosion Resistance. 8.7.1 Aqueous Corrosion. 8.7.2 Hot-medium Corrosion. References. 9 Applications of Coatings. 9.1 Aeronautical and Space Industries. 9.1.1 Aero-engines. 9.1.2 Landing-gear Components. 9.1.3 Rocket Thrust-chamber Liners. 9.2 Agroalimentary Industry. 9.3 Automobile Industry. 9.4 Ceramics Industry. 9.4.1 Free-standing Samples. 9.4.2 Brick-Clay Extruders. 9.4.3 Crucibles to Melt Oxide Ceramics. 9.4.4 Ceramic Membranes. 9.5 Chemical Industry. 9.5.1 Photocatalytic Surfaces. 9.5.2 Tools in Petrol Search Installations. 9.5.3 Vessels in Chemical Refineries. 9.5.4 Gas-well Tubing. 9.5.5 Polymeric Coatings on Pipeline Components. 9.5.6 Ozonizer Tubes. 9.6 Civil Engineering. 9.7 Decorative Coatings. 9.8 Electronics Industry. 9.8.1 Heaters. 9.8.2 Sources for Sputtering. 9.8.3 Substrates for Hybrid Microelectronics. 9.8.4 Capacitor Electrodes. 9.8.5 Conductor Paths for Hybrid Electronics. 9.8.6 Microwave Integrated Circuits. 9.9 Energy Generation and Transport. 9.9.1 Solid-oxide Fuel Cell (SOFCs). 9.9.2 Thermopile Devices for Thermoelectric Generators. 9.9.3 Boilers in Power-generation Plants. 9.9.4 Stationary Gas Turbines. 9.9.5 Hydropower Stations. 9.9.6 MHD Generators. 9.10 Iron and Steel Industries. 9.10.1 Continuous Annealing Line (CAL). 9.10.2 Continuous Galvanizing Section. 9.10.3 Stave Cooling Pipes. 9.11 Machine Building Industry. 9.12 Medicine. 9.13 Mining Industry. 9.14 Non-ferrous Metal Industry. 9.14.1 Hot-extrusion Dies. 9.14.2 Protective Coatings against Liquid Copper. 9.14.3 Protective Coatings against Liquid Zirconium. 9.15 Nuclear Industry. 9.15.1 Components of Tokamak Device. 9.15.2 Magnetic-fusion Energy Device. 9.16 Paper Industry. 9.16.1 Dryers. 9.16.2 Gloss Calender Rolls. 9.16.3 Tubing in Boilers. 9.17 Printing and Packaging Industries. 9.17.1 Corona Rolls. 9.17.2 Anilox Rolls. 9.18 Shipbuiding and Naval Industries. 9.18.1 Marine Gas-turbine Engines. 9.18.2 Steam Valve Stems. 9.18.3 Non-skid Helicopter Flight Deck. References. Index.
Materials Science
1995
1 676
2
Thermal Spray: Current Status and Future Trends
Thermal spray is a continuous, directed, melt-spray process in which particles (e.g., 1–50 μm in diameter) of virtually any material are melted and accelerated to high velocities, through either a combustion flame or a dc or rf nontransferred thermal-plasma arc. The molten or semimolten droplets impinge on a substrate and rapidly solidify to form a thin “splat.” The deposit is built up by successive impingement and interbonding among the splats. The splats accumulate into a wellbonded deposit, generally > 10 μm thick.
Materials Science
2000
290
3
Engineering a new class of thermal spray nano-based microstructures from agglomerated nanostructured particles, suspensions and solutions: an invited review
From the pioneering works of McPherson in 1973 who identified nanometre-sized features in thermal spray conventional alumina coatings (using sprayed particles in the tens of micrometres size range) to the most recent and most advanced work aimed at manufacturing nanostructured coatings from nanometre-sized feedstock particles, the thermal spray community has been involved with nanometre-sized features and feedstock for more than 30 years.Both the development of feedstock (especially through cryo-milling, and processes able to manufacture coatings structured at the sub-micrometre or nanometre sizes, such as micrometre-sized agglomerates made of nanometre-sized particles for feedstock) and the emergence of thermal spray processes such as suspension and liquid precursor thermal spray techniques have been driven by the need to manufacture coatings with enhanced properties. These techniques result in two different types of coatings: on the one hand, those with a so-called bimodal structure having nanometre-sized zones embedded within micrometre ones, for which the spray process is similar to that of conventional coatings and on the other hand, sub-micrometre or nanostructured coatings achieved by suspension or solution spraying. Compared with suspension spraying, solution precursor spraying uses molecularly mixed precursors as liquids, avoiding a separate processing route for the preparation of powders and enabling the synthesis of a wide range of oxide powders and coatings. Such coatings are intended for use in various applications ranging from improved thermal barrier layers and wear-resistant surfaces to thin solid electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cell systems, among other numerous applications.Meanwhile these processes are more complex to operate since they are more sensitive to parameter variations compared with conventional thermal spray processes. Progress in this area has resulted from the unique combination of modelling activities, the evolution of diagnostic tools and strategies, and experimental advances that have enabled the development of a wide range of coating structures exhibiting in numerous cases unique properties. Several examples are detailed. In this paper the following aspects are presented successively (i) the two spray techniques used for manufacturing such coatings: thermal plasma and HVOF, (ii) sensors developed for in-flight diagnostics of micrometre-sized particles and the interaction of a liquid and hot gas flow, (iii) three spray processes: conventional spraying using micrometre-sized agglomerates of nanometre-sized particles, suspension spraying and solution spraying and (iv) the emerging issues resulting from the specific structures of these materials, particularly the characterization of these coatings and (v) the potential industrial applications.Further advances require the scientific and industrial communities to undertake new research and development activities to address, understand and control the complex mechanisms occurring, in particular, thermal flow?liquid drops or stream interactions when considering suspension and liquid precursor thermal spray techniques. Work is still needed to develop new measurement devices to diagnose in-flight droplets or particles below 2??m average diameter and to validate that the assumptions made for liquid?hot gas interactions.Efforts are also required to further develop some of the characterization protocols suitable to address the specificities of such nanostructured coatings, as some existing 'conventional' protocols usually implemented on thermal spray coatings are not suitable anymore, in particular to address the void network architectures from which numerous coatings properties are derived.
Materials Science
2011
178
4
Thermal Spray Processing of FGMs
Functionally gradient materials (FGMs) display continuously or discontinuously varying compositions and/or microstructures over definable geometrical distances. The gradients can be continuous on a microscopic level, or they can be laminates comprised of gradients of metals, ceramics, polymers, or variations of porosity/density. Several processing techniques have been explored for the fabrication of FGMs for structural applications, e.g., powder metallurgy, thermal spraying, in situ synthesis, self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, reactive infiltration, etc. Physical and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques are also being explored to process FGM films with nanometer level gradients in composition. This article addresses the issues related to thermal-spray processing of FGMs and will only peripherally compare the advantages and limitations of thermal spray versus other processing techniques as reported in the literature. In thermal spraying, feedstock material (in the form of powder, rod, or wire) is introduced into a combustion or plasma flame. The particles melt in transit and impinge on the substrate where they flatten, undergo rapid solidification, and form a deposit through successive impingement. Thermal spraying has been traditionally employed to produce a variety of protective coatings of ceramics, metals, and polymers on a range of substrates. More recently, the process has been used for spray-forming structural components. Arc spray, combustion, and plasma are the major techniques comprising thermal spray. These classifications are based on the type of heat source and the method by which feedstock is injected. Arc-spray processes use electrically conductive wire as feedstock, while combustion methods use powder or wire.
Materials Science
1995
147
5
Elastic Response of Thermal Spray Deposits under Indentation Tests
The elastic response behavior of thermal spray deposits at Knoop indentations has been investigated using indentation techniques. The ratio of hardness to elastic modulus, which is an important prerequisite for the evaluation of indentation fracture toughness, is determined by measuring the elastic recovery of the in-surface dimensions of Knoop indentations. The elastic moduli of thermal spray deposits are in the range of 12%-78% of the comparable bulk materials and reveal the anisotropic behavior of thermal spray deposits. A variety of thermal spray deposits has been examined, including Al2O3, yttria-stabilized ZrO2(YSZ), and NiAl. Statistical tools have been used to evaluate the error estimates of the data.
Geology, Materials Science
2005
119
6
A review of testing methods for thermal spray coatings
Abstract The primary focus of this review concerns the test methods used to evaluate thermal spray coatings. Techniques to measure coating intrinsic properties such as (i) porosity and (ii) residual stress state; as well as extrinsic mechanical properties that include (iii) hardness, (iv) adhesion, (v) elastic modulus, (vi) fracture toughness, and (vi) the Poisson’s ratio of thermal spray coatings are presented. This review also encompasses the feedstock and thermal spray method since process variants create a specific microstructure. An important aspect of this work is to highlight the extrinsic nature of mechanical property measurements with regard to thermal spray coatings. Thermal spray coatings exhibit anisotropic behaviour and microstructural artefacts such as porosity and the splat structure of coatings influence the mechanical characterisation methods. The analysis of coating data variability evolving from the different measurement techniques is of particular relevance to interpret the character of thermal spray deposits. Many materials can be thermal sprayed but this review focuses on alumina and partially stabilised zirconia since (i) these materials have many proven applications, and (ii) there is a wealth of information that has been reported on these ceramics.
Materials Science
2014
89
7
Thermal Spray Coatings
THERMAL SPRAY is a generic term for a group of processes in which metallic, ceramic, cermet, and some polymeric materials in the form of powder, wire, or rod are fed to a torch or gun with which they are heated to near or somewhat above their melting point. The resulting molten or nearly molten droplets of material are accelerated in a gas stream and projected against the surface to be coated (i.e., the substrate). On impact, the droplets flow into thin lamellar particles adhering to the surface, overlapping and interlocking as they solidify. The total coating thickness is usually generated in multiple passes of the coating device. The invention of the first thermal spray process is generally attributed to M.U. Schoop of Switzerland in 1911 and is now known as flame spraying. Other major thermal spray processes include wire spraying, detonation gun deposition (invented by R.M. Poorman, H.B. Sargent, and H. Lamprey and patented in 1955), plasma spray (invented by R.M. Gage, O.H. Nestor, and D.M. Yenni and patented in 1962), and high velocity oxyfuel (invented by G.H. Smith, J.E Pelton, and R.C. Eschenbach and patented in 1958). Avariant of plasma spraying uses a transferred arc to heat the surface being coated. It is considered by some to be a welding process akin to hard facing rather than a true thermal spray process, because the surface of the substrate becomes momentarily molten immediately beneath the torch. A major advantage of the thermal spray processes is the extremely wide variety of materials that can be used to make a coating. Virtually any material that melts without decomposing can be used. A second major advantage is the ability of most of the thermal spray processes to apply a coating to a substrate without significantly heating it. Thus, materials with very high melting points can be applied to finally machined, fully heat-treated parts without changing the properties of the part and without thermal distortion of the part. A third advantage is the ability, in most cases, to strip and recoat worn or damaged coatings without changing the properties or dimensions of the part. A major disadvantage is the line-of-sight nature of these deposition processes. They can only coat what the torch or gun can "see." Of course, there are also size limitations prohibiting the coating of small, deep cavities into which a torch or gun will not fit. Figure 1 shows an example of the variety of shapes taken by the molten droplets as they impact, flow, and solidify on the surface. The mechanism of bonding of the particles to the surface is not well understood but is thought to be largely due to mechanical interlocking of the solidifying and shrinking particles, with asperities on the surface being coated unless supplemental fusion or diffusion heat treatment is used. Indeed, most thermal spray coatings require a roughened substrate surface for adequate bonding. Some interdiffusion or localized fusion of as-deposited coatings with the substrate has been observed in a few instances with unique combinations of coatings and substrates. There is evidence of chemical bonding in some coating/substrate systems, not unreasonable when the high-velocity impact of particles might be expected to rupture any films on either the powder particles or the substrate. In addition, van der Waals forces may play a role if the substrate is extremely clean and no significant oxidation occurs during deposition. Thermal spray coatings are usually formed by multiple passes of a torch or gun over the surface. Typical cross sections of several examples of thermal spray coatings are shown in Fig. 2, illustrating the lamellar nature of the coatings. A coating can be made of virtually any material that can be melted without decomposing. Moreover, the deposition process itself can substantially alter the composition as well as the structure of the material. As a result, the microstructure and properties of the coatings can be extremely varied. Specification of a coating, therefore, must often involve more than simply stating the composition of the starting powder or wire and the general type of process to be used. The applications of thermal spray coatings are extremely varied, but the largest categories of use are to enhance the wear and/or corrosion resistance of a surface. Other applications include their use for dimensional restoration, as thermal barriers, as thermal conductors, as electrical conductors or resistors, for electromagnetic shielding, and to enhance or retard radiation. They are used in virtually every industry, including aerospace, agricultural implements, automotive, primary metals, mining, paper, oil and gas production, chemicals and plastics, and biomedical. Some specific examples are given in the section "Uses of Thermal Spray Coatings" in this article.
2007
80
8
Steam Oxidation Resistance of Ni-Cr Thermal Spray Coatings on 9Cr-1Mo Steel. Part 1 : 80Ni-20Cr
The steam oxidation resistance of 80%Ni-20%Cr metallic coatings has been evaluated at four different steam temperatures in the range of 600-750°C. Substrate used for the study was 9Cr-1 Mo type steel. The thermal spray coatings were carried out using two different processes, viz., atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) spray. Thickness of the coatings was about 40 and 60μm respectively. The results show that the thick and dense HVOF coating showed a better steam oxidation resistance than the thin porous APS coatings. At prolonged aging (1 000 h) the HVOF coating showed the best protection till the temperature range of 650°C. Beyond this temperature the presence of Fe 2 O 3 was noticed at the coating surface. The reason for the protectiveness and failure at higher temperatures (above 650°C) are discussed in detail.
Materials Science
2003
64
9
Characterisation and Corrosion-Erosion Behaviour of Carbide based Thermal Spray Coatings
Thermal spraying has emerged as a suitable and effective surface engineering technology and is widely used to apply wear, erosion and corrosion protective coatings for various kinds of industrial applications. Cr3C2-based coatings have been applied to a wide range of industrial components. Cr3C2–NiCr coatings offer greater corrosion and oxidation resistance, also having a high melting point and maintaining high hardness, strength and wear resistance up to a maximum operating temperature of 900 °C. The corrosion resistance is provided by NiCr matrix while the wear resistance is mainly due to the carbide ceramic phase. This paper reviews the performance, developments and applications of Cr3C2–NiCr thermal spray coatings for corrosion/erosion-corrosion under different types of environments and outlines the characterization of Cr3C2–NiCr coatings with respect to their microstructure and mechanical properties, together with some brief characterisation work by the author for HVOF sprayed 75Cr3C2-25NiCr coating on T91 boiler steel.
Materials Science
2012
61
10
Diamond Jet Hybrid HVOF Thermal Spray: Gas-Phase and Particle Behavior Modeling and Feedback Control Design
This paper focuses on the modeling and control of an industrial high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process (Diamond Jet hybrid gun, Sulzer Metco, Westbury, NY). We initially develop a fundamental model for the process that describes the evolution of the gas thermal and velocity fields and the motion and temperature of particles of different sizes and explicitly accounts for the effect of the powder size distribution. Using the proposed model, a comprehensive parametric analysis is performed to systematically characterize the influence of controllable process variables such as the combustion pressure and oxygen/fuel ratio, as well as the effect of the powder size distribution, on the values of the particle velocity, temperature, and degree of melting at the point of impact on the substrate. (These are the variables that directly influence coating microstructure and porosity, which, in turn, determine coating strength and hardness; see the second article of this series for details.) A feedback c...
Materials Science, Chemistry
2004
61

Top 10 cited authors

#AuthorPapers countCitation Count
1
105
3 505
2
21
2 477
3
33
2 011
4
120
1 948
5
58
1 653
6
42
1 319
7
63
1 287
8
9
1 162
9
27
1 102
10
19
1 045

Science papers by Year

Clinical Trials

  • Researches Count 0
  • Ongoing Studies 0
  • Total Enrollment

Use Cases

#TopicPaper TitleYearFields of studyCitationsUse CaseAuthors
1
Thermal Spray
Cocraly + Hbn Composite Coatings Deposited by High Velocity Oxy Fuel (Hvof) Thermal Spray for High Temperature (900 °C) Wear
2022
0
high temperature (900 °c) wear
2
Thermal Spray
A review on the development of thermal barrier coatings by using thermal spray techniques
2021
0
a review on the development of thermal barrier coatings by
3
Thermal Spray
Large-scale manufacturing route to metamaterial coatings using thermal spray techniques and their response to solar radiation
2021
0
large-scale manufacturing route to metamaterial coatings
4
Thermal Spray
Physical, mechanical and corrosion properties of Zn-15Al alloy coating deposited at different voltage using thermal spray process
2021
Physics, Materials Science
0
physical, mechanical and corrosion properties of zn-15al alloy coating deposited at different voltage
5
Thermal Spray
Analysis of Corrosion Resistance in Domestic Water Geysers by Coating Nano-Film Using Thermal Spray Coating
2020
Materials Science
0
analysis of corrosion resistance in domestic water geysers by coating nano-film
6
Thermal Spray
Characteristics Structural and Physical Properties of the System Cermet [Basalt - (Ni-Al)] Using Thermal Spray Flame Technology
2020
Materials Science
0
characteristics structural and physical properties of the system cermet [basalt - (ni-al)]
7
Thermal Spray
Hard Quasicrystalline Coatings Deposited by HVOF Thermal Spray to Reduce Ice Accretion in Aero-Structures Components
2020
Materials Science
9
reduce ice accretion in aero-structures components
8
Thermal Spray
Ni20Cr coating on T24 steel pipes by HVOF thermal spray for high temperature protection
2020
Materials Science
11
high temperature protection
9
Thermal Spray
Studying the Erosion Corrosion Behavior of NiCrAlY Coating Layer Applied on AISI 446 Stainless Steel Using Thermal Spray Technique
2020
Materials Science
1
studying the erosion corrosion behavior of nicraly coating layer applied on aisi 446 stainless steel
10
Thermal Spray
TLP bonding of Ti−6Al−4V to Al 2024 using thermal spray Babbitt alloy interlayer
2020
Materials Science
4
tlp bonding of ti−6al−4v to al 2024

Case Studies

#TitleDescriptionPDFYearSource Ranking
1
A Case study on blackening effect of Thermal Spray Aluminum ...
no
6 650
2
Agricultural Knives: Thermal Spray Case Study | Agriculture XPRT
The total average weight loss for Kondex knives was 3.4 g and total average weight loss for Brand “B” was 4.1 g, about a 17% difference.
no
20
3
Agricultural Knives: Thermal Spray Case Study III | ...
The purpose of these tests is two-fold: ... The existing blade is made with an austempered boron steel base material with a chrome carbide hard-face coating ...
no
20
4
AMPP Interview Series: Case Study: Thermal Spray Aluminum at a ...
Bo Andersen, product manager for thermal spray aluminum (TSA) at Integrated Global Services (IGS), shares experiences and lessons learned from his company's ...
no
40
5
Case Study - Thermal Spray and Grinding at Sulzer - Camfil APC
Sulzer is a leading independent service provider for all brands of rotating equipment such as turbines, pumps, compressors, generators, and motors.
no
10
6
Case Study | Thermal Spray Technologies, Inc. (TST) - PQ ...
This is true of TST which develops its products for industries that range from food processing to electronics. TST uses SQCpack and GAGEpack software from ...
no
10
7
Case Study: Thermal Spray Aluminum at a Major LNG Complex
no
580
8
Case Study: Thermal Spray Aluminum at a Major LNG Complex ...
Listen to this episode from AMPP Interview Series on Spotify. Bo Andersen, product manager for thermal spray aluminum (TSA) at Integrated Global Services ...
no
22 000
9
Substrate Melting During Thermal Spray Splat Quenching
Substrate Melting During Thermal Spray Splat Quenching: Case Study for Molybdenum Droplets on Various Substrates. Author: L. Li, X.Y.Wang, A. Vaidya and S.
no
40
10
Weartech SHS Thermal Spray Coating on Boiler Tubes
Inside a CFB boiler at a coal fired power plant in Pennsylvania, a thermal spray coating field trial comparison was conducted on a section of boiler tubes ...function _setImagesSrc(e,d){function f(b){b.onerror=function(){b.style.display="none"};b.src=d}for(var g=0,a=void 0;a=e[g++];){var c=document.getElementById(a)||document.querySelector('img[data-iid="'+a+'"]');c?(a=void 0,(null==(a=google.c)?0:a.setup)&&google.c.setup(c),f(c)):(google.iir=google.iir||{},google.iir[a]=d)}}"undefined"==typeof window.google&&(window.google={});(function(){var s='data:image/jpeg;base64,/9j/4AAQSkZJRgABAQAAAQABAAD/2wCEAAkGBwgHBgkIBwgKCgkLDRYPDQwMDRsUFRAWIB0iIiAdHx8kKDQsJCYxJx8fLT0tMTU3Ojo6Iys/RD84QzQ5OjcBCgoKDQwNGg8PGjclHyU3Nzc3Nzc3Nzc3Nzc3Nzc3Nzc3Nzc3Nzc3Nzc3Nzc3Nzc3Nzc3Nzc3Nzc3Nzc3Nzc3N//AABEIAFwAXAMBIgACEQEDEQH/xAAcAAABBQEBAQAAAAAAAAAAAAAFAQIEBgcDAAj/xAA0EAACAQMDAgUDAwMDBQAAAAABAgMABBEFEiEGMRMiQVFhFHGBMpGxQqHwByNSFiRDotH/xAAZAQACAwEAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAACBAABAwX/xAAlEQACAgEDAwUBAQAAAAAAAAAAAQIRAwQSQRQxURMhYXGBMyT/2gAMAwEAAhEDEQA/
no
0

Experts

Twitter

#NameDescriptionFollowersFollowingLocation
1
Metallisation Ltd
Supplier of Thermal Spray Equipment and Consumables since 1922. Coating equipment to apply metallic and ceramic coatings.
1 178
938
Dudley, United Kingdom
2
F.W. Gartner Thermal Spraying - Curtiss-Wright
F.W. Gartner Thermal Spraying is a business unit of Curtiss-Wright Surface Technologies.
252
1 084
Houston, TX
3
Industrial Machine
Custom & production machining, specialty welding & fabrication, thermal spray coatings & industrial mechanic services to the heavy resource industries & OEMs.
205
331
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
4
Christiane Schulz
Materials Engineer, Thermal Spraying - Laser Cladding - Additive Manufacturing Expert
137
143
Adelaide, South Australia

Youtube Channels

#NameDescriptionReg DateViewsCountry
1
We are largest Manufacturer & Exporter of Grit Blasting Machine, Sand Blasting Machine, Shot Blasting Machine, Metalizing Gun, Thermal Spray Gun and Equipments, Industrial Dust Collectors, Zinc Spray Gun, Thermal Spray Booth, Blast Room System, Painting Booth
Thu, 15 Aug 2013
271 769
2
Thermal Care is an essential business & industry expert in process heating & cooling solutions. We believe in providing superior equipment, exceptional service, fostering excellence and inspiring confidence in our customers & employees. Since 1969, we've been manufacturing trusted products, such as: Central Chillers, Cooling Towers, Filtration Equipment, Heat Exchangers, Portable & Packaged Chillers, Pumping Systems, Temperature Controllers and Water Treatment Systems. Our products provide a wide range of process heating & cooling solutions from off-the-shelf models to integrated, customized systems. Industries that we’ve serviced worldwide for over 50 years are: Anodizing & Plating, Botanical Oil Extraction, Brewery & Distillery Glycol Chillers, Chemical, Die Casting, Food & Beverage, Heat Treating & Induction, HVAC, Lasers, Medical & Pharmaceutical, Optical Coating, Plastics Processing, Thermal Spraying, Water Jet Pumps & Cutting Machinery and Welding Machinery.
Tue, 1 May 2012
180 754
United States
3
Metal Improvement Company LLC are a business unit of Curtiss-Wright Surface Technologies and offer a variety of industries and major OEM's a range of surface treatments that are designed to extend the life and enhance the performance of critical components. Our services include controlled shot peening, laser peening, shot peen forming, thermal spray technology, engineered coatings and analytical services among others.
Wed, 11 Apr 2012
153 729
4
Our engineering staff offers more experience in adapting thermal spray to the resolution of problems than any other institution in the community. APS processes can apply and manipulate materials to feature specific surface qualities, such as bio-active/bio-inert, dielectric, semiconducting and thermo-insulating.
Wed, 13 May 2009
51 370
5
Is a complete machine factory with thermal spraying as core business. This means that in addition to manufacturing parts, we also apply metallic, ceramic and carbide layers to new and used machine parts. Thermal spraying is a collective name for various techniques in which a layer of metal (a coating or top layer) is applied around wear-sensitive parts. These layers are used to preventively provide the parts with properties that the base material of this part itself does not possess. You can think of wear resistance, hardness, corrosion resistance or chemical resistance. We can also return worn parts to the desired/original dimensions. This while the temperature of your parts will not exceed 100°C. You can reach us by sending an email or calling +31 (0)76 542 01 40.
Thu, 3 Mar 2011
23 428
6
Plasma Powders & Systems, Inc., celebrating over 30 Years in the Thermal Spray Industry! We offer Thermal Spray powders, as well as Thermal Spray equipment & replacement parts. Our extensive Thermal Spray services include: Spray Wire & Powder, In A Wide Range Of Sizes & Compositions Turn Key Systems Individual Components Masking Materials Training Demonstrations Material & Process Development Handling Equipment Robotic Integration Thermal Spray Equipment & Parts On Site Equipment Overhaul Repair Services Business Phone: (732) 431-0992 Email: [email protected] Website: http://www.plasmapowders.com/
Thu, 16 May 2013
20 937
United States
7
Wisdom is a leading manufacturer & supplier of Hardfacing alloys, Thermal spray alloys and Nickel based welding alloys in wire, rod, powder forms at competitive prices to cater to the diverse and continuously changing needs of customers.
Mon, 21 Mar 2016
20 276
China
8
Thermal spray coating dan perbaikan alat alat industri
Sat, 28 Jul 2012
18 529
Indonesia
9
METALLIZING EQUIPMENT CO. PVT. LTD (MEC) was established in 1967 and developed as a leading manufacturer of Thermal Spray Equipments and Auxiliaries. Thermal Spray pro-called metallizing or metal spraying is a surface modification technique – a branch of Surface Engineering. Thermal Spraying , a group of coating processes in which finely divided metallic or nonmetallic materials are deposited in a molten or semi-molten condition to form a coating. The coating material may be in the form of powder, ceramic-rod, or wire. Thermal Spray process has advantage over other processes as it is cold process so it never distorts parent material, thickness of coating is controllable with no limitation of job size. Loss of surface properties due to wear, corrosion, abrasion, erosion, cavitation etc. can be avoided in a cost effective manner by thermal spray coating. For Inquiry Send Email at [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]
Wed, 10 Jun 2015
17 592
India
10
Thermal Spray Technologies (TST), part of the The Fisher-Barton Group, is a leader in surface engineering, specializing in highly engineered coating solutions for a wide range of customer applications. Founded in 1992 and located in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin, TST is a trusted partner to OEMs worldwide, helping them optimize machine designs with coatings that increase component life span, decrease machine downtime and improve overall performance. Dental, medical, mining, military, oil and gas, power generation, electronics, food processing and printing are just a few industry segments that have benefited from TST's materials expertise. Always pushing the limits of technology, coatings developed by TST, provide many functional benefits as well as being environmentally safe. For more information, visit www.tstcoatings.com.
Mon, 16 Jan 2012
17 198