Medical Technology

Summary

  • 2 146 Companies
  • 5 Patents
  • 70 Use Cases
  • 129 Case Studies
  • 687 Science Papers
  • $3 693 228 659 Total Funding

Companies

#Organisation NameIndustriesHeadquarterDescriptionFounded YearCompany TypeNum of Employees
1
Engineering
Union City, CA
At GCM, we go beyond simply offering component-manufacturing services by providing our OEM partners a full range of solutions from product design to manufacturing capabilities. Our problem-solving savvy is enriched by our engineering skills and diverse experiences, spanning nearly four decades of partnership with Medical Technology and Aerospace customers. When it comes to servicing global customers, GCM is the ideal partner. With approximately 280,000 sq. ft. of manufacturing space in the United States and China, GCM has the Global presence to support customers worldwide. We are successful through a collaborative approach to engineering, ideal for forward moving customers who value excellence in product realization. Our specialization in large footprint machining and fabrication of precision, complex components, allows GCM to go beyond manufacturing in support of customers seeking a true extension of their company.
1978
Privately Held
500
2
Medical Devices
Kalamazoo, MI
Stryker is one of the world’s leading medical technology companies and, together with its customers, is driven to make healthcare better. The company offers innovative products and services in Orthopaedics, Medical and Surgical, and Neurotechnology and Spine that help improve patient and hospital outcomes. More information is available at www.stryker.com. PRODUCTS: ● Reconstructive ● MedSurg ● Neurotechnology & Spine FACTS: ● 2020 Sales: $14.4 Billion ● Industry : Medical Instruments & Supplies ● Employees : 43,000+ globally ● 40 Years of Sales Growth leading up to 2020 ● 44+ Manufacturing and R&D Locations Worldwide ● $984 million spend on research and development in 2020 ● 10,452 patents owned globally in 2020 ● Products Sold in Over 100+ Countries ● Fortune 500 Company ● #5 World's Best Workplace in 2020 IMPORTANT NOTE TO JOB APPLICANTS: POTENTIAL FRAUD ALERT. Stryker has become aware of a fraud where unknown entities are posing as Stryker recruiters in an attempt to obtain personal information from individuals as part of our application or job offer process. Before providing any personal information to outside parties, please verify the following: A) all legitimate Stryker recruiter email addresses end with “@stryker.com” and B) the position described is found on our careers site at careers.stryker.com.
-
Public Company
43802
3
Manufacturing
Sachseln
At maxon, we develop and build high precision electric drive systems that are among the best in the world. We combine brushed and brushless DC motors, gearheads, sensors, and controllers into complete mechatronic drive systems. Since 1961, businesses from a wide range of industries including medical technology, industrial automation, mobility solutions, and aerospace place their trust in reliable drive systems by maxon. Our drives are perfectly suited for wherever extreme precision and the highest quality standards are necessary and where compromises cannot be tolerated – on Earth, and on Mars.. maxon's engineers are real partners when it comes to finding specific solutions. Prototypes, custom systems, or large series: whatever the requirement, we are happy to be of assistance with our global sales network, nine production sites, and more than 3000 employees. For more information please visit www.maxongroup.com or take a look at our corporate blog www.drive.tech
1961
Privately Held
792
4
Healthcare
Beijing, Beijing
Lepu Medical Technology (Beijing) Co., Ltd. was established in 1999. Lepu Medical is specialized in developing, manufacturing and distributing the high-tech medical devices and equipment. Today, Lepu Medical has grown into a global leading group company in the fields of cardiovascular, neurovascular and peripheral vascular interventions, structural heart diseases, surgical cardiology, cardiac rhythm management, anesthesia and intensive care, in vitro diagnostics and general surgery with products include coronary stents, dilatation balloon catheters, interventional accessories, occlusion devices, mechanical heart valves, electrophysiology catheters, pacemakers, cardiac in vitro diagnosis products, anesthetic products, angiography systems and surgical staplers. In 2009, Lepu Medical successfully listed on ChiNext Shenzhen Stock Exchange market (stock code: 300003) with the market value of 10 billion USD. Now Lepu Medical totally has 28 primary subsidiary companies worldwide. There are more than 60 products have received the CE certificates, and 6 products have got the FDA approvals. As the National Interventional Cardiology Medical Instruments & Engineering Technology Research Center, Lepu Medical Group’s top strategy is to build up a 4 in 1 platform includes medical device, pharmaceutical, Healthcare Service, Mobile Medical. Currently, Lepu Medical has established three overseas subsidiary companies in Netherland, Turkey and India, obtained local registrations in 27 countries, and built the sales and distribution channels in over 80 countries and regions. Lepu Medical upholds “integrity, quality and scientific innovation” as its spirit, commitments to provide the best quality of products and services to satisfy the needs of healthcare professionals and patients.
1999
Public Company
562
5
Medical Devices
Bilthoven
Avania brings knowledgeable experts together to form a unique CRO that advances the research of medical devices, novel technology, and combination products across a wide range of therapeutic specialties. Our motivated team takes you from feasibility all the way through post-market trials. Our experts in data management and analytics, clinical trial design & execution, strategic consulting, regulatory, reimbursement, and more will provide you with customized, scalable solutions that optimize efficiencies and streamline the advancement of your medical technology. Your product is important, and your company deserves the team that has what it takes. It takes knowledge. It takes passion. It takes commitment. It takes Avania.
-
Privately Held
267
6
Medical Devices
Ulm, Baden-Württemberg
ulrich medical develops, produces and markets innovative medical technology. Physicians and users worldwide trust our more than 100 years of experience. With product divisions in spinal implants, contrast media injectors and tourniquets, we offer a comprehensive portfolio of innovative products. We are one of the few in the industry with development and production in Germany and we rely on the most modern manufacturing technology. Our products stand worldwide for the highest degree of quality "Made in Germany"​. More than 450 employees work at the headquarters in Ulm. As an owner-run company, we operate independently and are proud of our continuous, healthy growth. Legal notice: http://www.ulrichmedical.com/en/legal-notice.html Privacy Statement: https://www.ulrichmedical.de/en/privacy-statement/
1912
Privately Held
218
7
Medical Devices
Washington, DC
Who We Are: AdvaMed's member companies produce the medical devices, diagnostic products and health information systems that are transforming health care through earlier disease detection, less invasive procedures and more effective treatments. Our members produce health care technology both in the United States and around the world. AdvaMed members range from the largest to the smallest medical technology innovators and companies. Our Mission: AdvaMed advocates for a legal, regulatory and economic environment that advances global health care by assuring worldwide patient access to the benefits of medical technology. We promote policies that foster the highest ethical standards, rapid product approvals, appropriate reimbursement, and access to international markets. To achieve this, AdvaMed promotes: Speedier product approvals by industry regulators worldwide; More timely coverage and payment determinations globally; Fair access to international markets; and Effective communications about the value of medical technology to key audiences including legislators, regulators, medical societies and patient organizations.
1974
Nonprofit
162
8
Medical Devices
Brecksville, OH
Applied Medical Technology, Inc. (AMT) is a global leader and manufacturer of enteral feeding devices and surgical products, upholding the highest standard for performance and quality assurance for over 30 years. We are located in Brecksville, OH - just 15 minutes south of Cleveland! AMT is a great place to work: great medical, dental, and vision offered, PTO begins accruing on day 1, 401K with match opportunities, employee wellness programs, and a family environment. Where your co-workers become your friends! We are more than just a manufacturing facility; we are committed to the highest level of quality, safety, and patient care. We are interested in the whole person, not just the device they use. At our facility, we continue to create and manufacture innovative medical devices, such as the AMT Bridle™ and Bridle Pro® Nasal Tube Retaining System, the AMT MiniONE® family of low profile G-Tube buttons, the AMT G-JET® low profile gastro-jejunal enteral tube and the AMT MiniACE® antegrade contience enema button. All AMT products are designed in, manufactured in, and supported from the USA. Please review our privacy statement: https://www.appliedmedical.net/legal/privacy-policy/ © 2020 Applied Medical Technology, Inc.
1986
Privately Held
154
9
Medical Devices
Hamburg, Hamburg
We understand your business WEINMANN Emergency is a global, family-owned medical technology company. With professional backgrounds in medical emergency services, fire brigades and healthcare, our team of 230 employees around the world know our products from both the manufacturer’s side and the users’ side. This authentic experience, combined with our creative mindset and dynamic approach, allows us to deliver the right solution when it matters most. We know that it is not enough to understand our own business, we must also understand yours! Hand-in-hand with professionals For more than 100 years, we have been developing mobile system solutions for emergency, transport and disaster medicine while setting standards for saving human lives. In close cooperation with emergency medical services, hospitals and military medical corps professionals, we create innovative medical products for ventilation and defibrillation. Because of our products'​ exceptional "Made in Germany"​ quality and our significant experience, our objective is to provide products that will help you ensure that the best possible patient outcome is provided each and every time. If you are interested in joining our team contact us by e-mail to [email protected] Do you have questions regarding our products and services? Please find more information on our website www.weinmann-emergency.com or contact our customer service by e-mail to [email protected] WEINMANN Emergency Medical Technology GmbH + Co. KG Frohbösestraße 12 22525 Hamburg Germany T: +49 - (0)40 - 88 18 96 - 0 F: +49 - (0)40 - 88 18 96 - 480 E: [email protected] Authorized Representatives / Managing Directors: Dipl.-Volksw. Marc Griefahn Dipl.-Kfm. Philipp Schroeder Dipl.-Volksw. André Schulte Registration Court: Local Court Hamburg, Section A, No. 115967 General Partner: WEINMANN Emergency Management GmbH, Hamburg Local Court Hamburg, Section B, No. 38144 Turnover Tax Identification Number in accordance with §27 of Turnover Tax Law: DE 288367727 Responsible for content in accordance with § 10 MDStV: André Schulte
1874
Sole Proprietorship
136
10
-
North Jakarta, Jakarta
Megasetiaº - IMCD Company is the No. 1 specialty ingredients and medical technology, solution and service partner in consulting, product development, supply chain and marketing for the health and well-being industry in Indonesia. Megasetiaº - IMCD Company is partnering with you collaboratively and care We collaborate & care with clients and our team of chemists and experts across business units to solve challenges and improve our built-to-suit solutions to you with care from regulatory to formulation, lab to manufacturing. Megasetiaº - IMCD Company is partnering together with you to bring science to life. We pave the way to future for turning scientific ideas into applicable solutions. From sourcing up to market-ready product innocations. Along the entire value chain we are constantly striving to improve business operations and to find even better solutions, everyday products like soaps, cosmetics, vitamins, food packaging, footwear, adhesives, animal feeds and daily preventative medical prescriptions. Megasetiaº - IMCD Company is partnering together transforming challenges into solutions. Through technology, innovation, chemistry and cold chain transportation, we're helping to solve global challenges in pharmaceutical, personal care, home care, functional foods, industrial goods, animal health, medical technology & beyond. In late 2021, IMCD Company and Megasetiaº has signed a binding agreement to partner with IMCD. IMCD is a global leader in the distribution and formulation of specialty chemicals and ingredients, offering a range of comprehensive product portfolios, including innovative formulations that embrace industry trends
1995
Public Company
114

Patents

#NumberTitleAbstractDateKindAssigneeInventor
1
10 966 680
Method for controlling the operation of a medical technology device, operator device, operating system and medical technology device
A method is for controlling operation of a medical technology device using a wireless, hand-held, mobile operator device including a touchscreen. The wireless, hand-held, mobile operator device including a touchscreen is also disclosed. The method includes using the mobile operator device for implementing a medical technology workflow including acquiring patient data of the at least one patient from an acquisition user interface; selecting, via a selection user interface, a medical technology protocol containing operating parameters to be carried out for the at least one patient; setting remote-controllably adjustable components of the medical technology device, according to the at least one patient positioned in the medical technology device and according to the medical technology protocol, using a settings user interface; and activating, with the at least one patient positioned and components set, the medical technology procedure in an activation user interface.
B2
SIEMENS HEALTHCARE GMBH
Asa MacWilliams, Robert Kagermeier, Gerben Ten Cate
2
10 751 239
Medical technology station and method of use
The invention includes a medical technology station and a method for using the medical technology cart. The station can be a portable cart that can be movable, such as rollable, and has a computer system. Attached to the cart is a housing that communicates with the computer system. Insertable in the housing is a cassette system that includes a series of drawers. The drawers are openable and preferably closeable on command from a user. The drawers have a readable unique drawer identifier that is readable by sensors in the cassette. The cassette also preferably includes proximity sensors, while the drawers contain a target for the proximity sensors. In use, an operator, with proper credentials, can, though the computer system, identify a drawer to be opened by the computer system. The cassette and drawers can be removed from the housing and transported to another location for filling of the drawers with medications or other supplies.
B2
Humanscale Corporation
Adam Piotrowski, Krzysztof Sosniak, Marcel Ipince, Harry Tan, Robert Volek, Jack Finnerty, Jin Chen, Charles Pfeiffer
3
10 148 767
Method and mobile unit updating the configuration of a medical technology apparatus without an internet connection
A mobile unit with a memory is temporarily connected to a medical technology apparatus is temporarily connected to a central storage device for data transmission. When the mobile unit is connected to the medical technology apparatus, a real configuration of the medical technology apparatus is compared with a local virtual image of the configuration of the medical technology apparatus held in the memory of the mobile unit. Depending on this comparison, the local configuration and/or the real configuration are updated. When the mobile unit is connected to the central storage device, the local configuration is compared with a central virtual image of the configuration of the medical technology apparatus. Depending on this comparison, the central configuration and/or the local configuration are updated. Via the indirect route of the local configuration this enables the real configuration and the central configuration to be mutually updated.
B2
Siemens Healthcare GmbH
Thomas Blum
4
9 968 715
Method for depositing coloured markers made from titanium oxides on medical technology products and coating system for producing coated materials
The invention relates to medical technology products, for example a medical implant or a medical instrument, having colored markings based on titanium oxides, to the use of coatings based on titanium oxides for the production of coated materials, such as medical technology products, in particular for titanium oxide-based coating for the colored marking of the surface of medical technology products, and to a method for depositing colored markings based on titanium oxides on medical technology products.
B2
FRAUNHOFER-GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FORDERUNG DER ANGEWANDTEN
Thomas Lukasczyk, Andreas Keil, Jost Degenhardt, Ralph Wilken, Dirk Salz, Jörg Ihde
5
8 911 437
Medical technology device and medical technology device arrangement
The invention concerns a medical technology device for treatment of the human or animal body, comprising at least one electrical plug connector which is adapted to be connected to a complementary counterpart plug connector of a further medical technology device and which in an active position is arranged projecting upwardly at the top side of the device. To provide a medical technology device which can be used both as an individual device and also in conjunction with a second device as a device arrangement and which in that respect satisfies existing safety and aesthetic demands, it is provided in accordance with the invention that the plug connector is adapted to be movable from the active position into a passive position, wherein in the passive position the plug connector is removed from the top side of the device and the top side is closed in substantially fluid-tight relationship.
B2
Olympus Winter & Ibe GmbH
André Roggan, Timo Strauss, Christopher Sprenger, Andreas Hörlle, Uwe Fischer, Stefan Schiddel, Wolfgang Kühne

Patents by Year

Inventors

Assignees

Assignees

Science

Data limited by 2021

Top 10 cited papers

#Paper TitlePaper AbstractAuthorsFields of StudyYearCitation Count
1
The practice of medical technology.
In this article, we review 25 years of sociological scholarship published in Sociology of Health and Illness on medical technologies. We divide the literature into three theoretical perspectives: technological determinism views medical technology as a political force to shape social relationships, social essentialism emphasizes how medical technologies are neutral tools to be interpreted in social interactions, and technology-in-practice highlights the dialectic relationship between technology and its users in health care. While the technology-in-practice orientation allows social scientists to critique the high hopes and dire warnings embedded in medical technologies, we argue that the logical next step of this paradigm is to move beyond criticism and influence the creation and implementation of medical technologies.
Sociology, Medicine
2003
348
2
Control of confounding in the assessment of medical technology.
Separation of the effects of extraneous variables from the effects of a factor under study (often termed control of confounding) is one of the key prerequisites for validly estimating the magnitude of the study factor's effects. Because of the phenomenon of confounding by indication, confounding of effects of different factors is a common problem in the assessment of medical technology. We give several examples illustrating that the decision of whether a recorded variable is a confounder in a data-set must be decided on the basis of subject-matter knowledge and clinical judgement. There is no alternative to use of such judgement; statistical selection procedures based on significant tests, such as stepwise regression, can be particularly misleading.
Medicine
1980
206
3
Cascade effects of medical technology.
Cascade effect refers to a process that proceeds in stepwise fashion from an initiating event to a seemingly inevitable conclusion. With regard to medical technology, the term refers to a chain of events initiated by an unnecessary test, an unexpected result, or patient or physician anxiety, which results in ill-advised tests or treatments that may cause avoidable adverse effects and/or morbidity. Examples include discovery of endocrine incidentalomas on head and body scans; irrelevant abnormalities on spinal imaging; tampering with random fluctuations in clinical measures; and unwanted aggressive care at the end of life. Common triggers include failing to understand the likelihood of false-positive results; errors in data interpretation; overestimating benefits or underestimating risks; and low tolerance of ambiguity. Excess capacity and perverse financial incentives may contribute to cascade effects as well. Preventing cascade effects may require better education of physicians and patients; research on the natural history of mild diagnostic abnormalities; achieving optimal capacity in health care systems; and awareness that more is not the same as better.
Medicine
2002
180
4
Medical technology as a key driver of rising health expenditure: disentangling the relationship
Health care spending has risen steadily in most countries, becoming a concern for decision-makers worldwide. Commentators often point to new medical technology as the key driver for burgeoning expenditures. This paper critically appraises this conjecture, based on an analysis of the existing literature, with the aim of offering a more detailed and considered analysis of this relationship. Several databases were searched to identify relevant literature. Various categories of studies (eg, multivariate and cost-effectiveness analyses) were included to cover different perspectives, methodological approaches, and issues regarding the link between medical technology and costs. Selected articles were reviewed and relevant information was extracted into a standardized template and analyzed for key cross-cutting themes, ie, impact of technology on costs, factors influencing this relationship, and methodological challenges in measuring such linkages. A total of 86 studies were reviewed. The analysis suggests that the relationship between medical technology and spending is complex and often conflicting. Findings were frequently contingent on varying factors, such as the availability of other interventions, patient population, and the methodological approach employed. Moreover, the impact of technology on costs differed across technologies, in that some (eg, cancer drugs, invasive medical devices) had significant financial implications, while others were cost-neutral or cost-saving. In light of these issues, we argue that decision-makers and other commentators should extend their focus beyond costs solely to include consideration of whether medical technology results in better value in health care and broader socioeconomic benefits.
Political Science, Economics, Medicine
2013
130
5
Medical Technology in Smart Homes: Exploring the User's Perspective on Privacy, Intimacy and Trust
This paper reports on a study exploring the attitudes of users towards video-based monitoring systems for long-term care of elderly or disabled people in smart home environments. The focus of the study was on investigating the willingness of users to accept medical technology in their homes and the specific conditions under which continuous monitoring would be acceptable. Using the questionnaire method, a total of 165 users (17-95 years) were examined regarding privacy, intimacy and trust issues for medical technology in homes. The results highlight trust and privacy as central requirements, especially when implemented within private spaces. The reported concerns were mostly insensitive to gender and age. Overall, it was revealed that acceptance issues and users' needs and wants should be seriously considered in order to successfully design new medical technologies.
Computer Science, Psychology
2011
112
6
The imperative character of medical technology and the meaning of "anticipated decision regret".
Medical-technical possibilities are often experienced as being strongly compelling. This imperative character of medical technology not only applies to the medical profession, but also to patients who frequently find it very difficult to refuse medical examinations or treatments. This article discusses the technological imperative with regard to patients. It attempts to discover relationships with decision theory, particularly concerning "anticipated decision regret." The fact that prevention of regret plays an important role in the use of medical technology is illustrated through a number of examples: liver transplantation, prenatal diagnosis, screening, and in vitro fertilization.
Medicine
1989
111
7
Hospital adoption of medical technology: an empirical test of alternative models.
OBJECTIVE This study examines hospital motivations to acquire new medical technology, an issue of considerable policy relevance: in this case, whether, when, and why hospitals acquire a new capital-intensive medical technology, magnetic resonance imaging equipment (MRI). STUDY DESIGN We review three common explanations for medical technology adoption: profit maximization, technological preeminence, and clinical excellence, and incorporate them into a composite model, controlling for regulatory differences, market structures, and organizational characteristics. All four models are then tested using Cox regressions. DATA SOURCES The study is based on an initial sample of 637 hospitals in the continental United States that owned or leased an MRI unit as of 31 December 1988, plus nonadopters. Due to missing data the final sample consisted of 507 hospitals. The data, drawn from two telephone surveys, are supplemented by the AHA Survey, census data, and industry and academic sources. PRINCIPAL FINDING Statistically, the three individual models account for roughly comparable amounts of variance in past adoption behavior. On the basis of explanatory power and parsimony, however, the technology model is "best." Although the composite model is statistically better than any of the individual models, it does not add much more explanatory power adjusting for the number of variables added. CONCLUSIONS The composite model identified the importance a hospital attached to being a technological leader, its clinical requirements, and the change in revenues it associated with the adoption of MRI as the major determinants of adoption behavior. We conclude that a hospital's adoption behavior is strongly linked to its strategic orientation.
Economics, Medicine
1995
106
8
Managed Care, Medical Technology, and Health Care Cost Growth: A Review of the Evidence
Although managed care plans reduce health care expenditures at any point in time, less is known about whether such plans control health care cost growth. Because use of new medical technology is an important determinant of cost growth, the impact of managed care on utilization of medical technology will largely determine whether managed care can reduce expenditure growth to sustainable levels. This article reviews the literature relating medical technology to cost growth and the literature examining the impact of managed care on either cost growth or on the diffusion of medical technology. Studies that examine plan-level data often reach different conclusions than studies that examine market-level data. The evidence suggests that managed care, as currently practiced, may reduce the rate of cost growth. However, managed care is unlikely to prevent the share of gross domestic product spent on health care from rising unless the cost-increasing nature of new technology changes.
Political Science, Medicine
1998
99
9
Local and international networks in small firm internationalization: cases from the Rhône-Alpes medical technology regional cluster
This study explores the internationalization processes of small firms operating in the medical technology cluster in the Rhône-Alpes region in France. The study demonstrates that both the location and the sectoral type of industry cluster influence the internationalization and network dynamics in the cluster. In addition, both local and international networks influence firm internationalization processes in different ways. First, the firm life-cycle, industry and locational cluster dynamics determine the extent of network influence on firms' internationalization processes. Second, two types of internationalizing firms emerge in this study: born global firms, led by proactive entrepreneurs and globally market-orientated firms from inception, and born-again globals, which engage in late but rapid internationalization as a result of new management or foreign acquisition. Third, local networks in the cluster are important for influencing the internationalization of the born global firm at inception. In contrast, international networks serve as the main impetus for re-launching internationalization for the born-again globals. Fourth, the local research institutions and their connections abroad help both born globals and born-again global firms develop and internationalize their innovations rapidly in the global marketplace.
Business
2013
93
10
Alternative Perspectives on the Biased Foundations of Medical Technology Assessment
The truths which are ultimately accepted as the first principles of a science, are really the last results of metaphysical analysis J. S. Mill, Utilitarianism Health care costs currently account for 14% of the U.S. Gross National Product-an increase from 9.4% in 1980-and are increasing at three times the rate of the Consumer Price Index [1]. The high cost of medical technology is only one of many reasons for these increases. Nevertheless, most physicians think that unnecessary use of medical technology has contributed to the rising cost of health care [2]; similar views are voiced both by the general public and by elected officials [3]. In response, increasing attention is directed at the process of medical technology assessment. This process, however, is built on a foundation of metaphysical assumptions about study design, data analysis, and practical clinical application [4]. We analyze the rational basis for several of these assumptions and discuss their implications for health care policy. Our goal is to optimize the relevance of technology assessment to the care of the individual patient. Efficacy versus Effectiveness New medical technology, whether drug or device, is usually evaluated using optimal conditions-in highly selected patient populations, by the best trained physicians, and in academic centers of excellence. As a result, the diffusion of technology from the investigational laboratory to clinical practice is fueled more by the promise of performance than by performance itself; despite this imbalance, both these characteristics are important. The drug, device, or procedure must first have utility among a group of patients in an ideal setting (efficacy), but it must also have utility for the individual patient in a realistic clinical setting (effectiveness) [5]. Reports of efficacy get published in journal articles, but many of these articles fail to emphasize the complex learning curve and limited range of applicability associated with a new technology, factors that are critical to the technology's effectiveness. Clinicians need to know more about the way a technology works in the real world-populated by real doctors, real patients, and real problems-than they do about the way it works in the utopian world described in a journal article [4, 6]. We shall illustrate this distinction with a relatively common example: the analysis of crossovers in a randomized, clinical trial. Crossovers Unintentional treatment crossover in a clinical trial occurs when a patient allocated to one treatment group receives the treatment intended for the other group. In a trial of coronary artery bypass surgery, for example, a patient assigned to receive medical treatment might decide to have surgery during the follow-up period because of worsening symptoms or a patient assigned to surgery might refuse the procedure and opt for medical treatment instead. Crossovers such as these are common in trials of coronary artery bypass surgery. In the Veterans Affairs (VA) Study [7], 17% of patients allocated to medical treatment had surgery during the next 21 months, and 6% of patients allocated to surgical treatment during that same period refused the procedure. The cumulative crossover to surgery in the VA trial increased to 30% after 8 years and to 38% after 11 years [8]. In the European Coronary Surgery Study (ECSS) [9], crossover rates after 5 years were 24% for medical allocations and 7% for surgical allocations. In the Coronary Artery Surgery Study (CASS) [10], crossover rates after 5 years were 24% for medical allocations and 8% for surgical allocations. Crossover rates of this magnitude raise serious concerns about bias. In CASS, noncompliant patients crossing from medical allocation to surgical treatment were more symptomatic and had more anatomic disease than did their compliant counterparts. The annual crossover rates for those in the medical group with single-, double-, and triple-vessel disease were 2.0%, 4.2%, and 7.6%, respectively (P < 0.001) [11]. In contrast, patients crossing from surgical allocation to medical treatment had fewer symptoms and less anatomic disease; 15% of patients with single-vessel disease refused surgery and crossed to medical therapy, whereas only 3% with triple-vessel disease did so (P = 0.02) [10]. By inference, then, treatment crossover in the CASS was related to the magnitude of myocardial ischemia and the risk for subsequent coronary events. This bias favored medical treatment, because sicker patients allocated to medical treatment tended to cross over to surgery (thereby decreasing the proportion of events among those actually receiving medical treatment), whereas healthier patients allocated to surgical treatment tended to refuse surgery (thereby increasing the proportion of events among those actually receiving surgical treatment). Because conclusions from clinical trials influence medical practice [11] and because this bias can lead to erroneous conclusions, the analysis and interpretation of such trials remain controversial. Several analytical methods can be used to deal with the problem. The first method is analysis by treatment received. In this case, patients are grouped according to the actual treatment administered, regardless of the initial assignment. The second method is analysis by treatment assigned. Here, patients are grouped according to the initial treatment allocation-the intention to treat-regardless of the actual treatment administered. These alternatives are the core of a long-standing debate between clinicians and statisticians. The clinicians argue that analysis by treatment assigned is unrealistic and misleading. They claim that patients not receiving treatment should not be analyzed as if they had. The statisticians argue that analysis by treatment received is naive and improper, because it is not the administration, but the allocation, of treatment that has been randomized. They maintain that a randomized trial should analyze only randomized groups. This debate can be resolved by recognizing that each analytic approach is best suited to a particular kind of trial [12, 13]. Explanatory Trials According to Schwartz and Lellouch [12], an explanatory trial is aimed at efficacy and understanding. The explanatory trial seeks to verify a biological hypothesis like: Treatment A is better than Treatment B. If we are interested in comparing the effect of coronary artery bypass surgery and coronary angioplasty on long-term survival, we might restrict the study to older patients with multivessel disease in whom survival differences will be easier to show during a reasonably short follow-up period. This design has two advantages: First, the investigator has precise control of the risk for wrongly concluding that A and B are different when they actually are not (the conventional false-positive or Type-I error) by choosing the threshold for statistical significance. Second, the investigator can also control the risk for wrongly concluding that A and B are not different when they actually are (the conventional false-negative or Type-II error) by determining the number of patients in the study. The disadvantage, however, is that the sample might be defined in a limited manner that restricts the inferential power of the conclusions (for example, with respect to younger patients or those with single-vessel disease). The goal of an explanatory trial requires that one compare groups defined by the treatment they actually received. Accordingly, treatment crossovers must be excluded from analysis, even though such exclusions will bias the analysis whenever the crossovers do not occur randomly. As a result, the explanatory power of such (pseudorandomized) trials is compromised, and they can no longer be relied on to determine if one treatment is better than the other. Pragmatic Trials A pragmatic trial is aimed at effectiveness and decision [12]. The pragmatic trial seeks to define the utility of choosing among available alternatives, thereby minimizing the probability of administering the inferior treatment: Should we recommend Treatment A or Treatment B? The disadvantage of the pragmatic trial is that it must be done in a large sample that is broadly representative with respect to the decision if the results are to be extrapolated. Its advantage is that the crossover problem is circumvented by definition. Because the result of recommending Treatment A to recommending Treatment B is being compared, rather than the result of administering Treatment A to administering Treatment B, the data can be analyzed with respect to the initial therapeutic allocation (treatment assigned) without regard for actual therapeutic administration (treatment received). Thus, although it has been claimed that analysis by treatment assigned results in reducing the clinical relevance of the findings [14], Schwartz and Lellouch [12] conclude that this analysis is precisely that of interest in practice. Computer Simulation of Crossover Ferguson and coworkers [15] recently did a series of computer simulations to quantify the effect of crossover from one treatment arm to another during a hypothetical, randomized clinical trial to compare the event-free survival of patients who had medical compared with surgical treatment of coronary artery disease. The simulation was designed so that the two treatments were actually equally effective. First, a logistic prediction model was constructed from an actual data set to predict 62 cardiac events among 598 patients who had rest-exercise radionuclide angiography (based on age, gender, resting left ventricular ejection fraction, exercise duration, and maximum exercise-induced, electrocardiographic ST-segment depression). Patients were randomly assigned to one of the two hypothetical treatment arms: surgery and medicine. Each patient was then selected for crossover to the other arm based on a crossover index defined as the product of a uniform random number and the probab
Medicine
1993
74

Top 10 cited authors

#AuthorPapers countCitation Count
1
2
780
2
1
754
3
1
754
4
1
754
5
1
754
6
1
754
7
1
714
8
1
714
9
1
714
10
1
714

Science papers by Year

Clinical Trials

  • Researches Count 8
  • Ongoing Studies 2
  • Total Enrollment 1 035

Clinical Trials by Year

Countries

Clinical Trials

#TitleConditionsInterventionsEnrollmentYearLocations
1
The Therapeutic Effect of the Rehabotics Medical Technology Corporation (RMTC) Finger-hand Robot on Upper-limb Rehabilitation of Stroke Patients
Stroke
Conventional OT, RMTC finger-hand robot (Mirror Hand)
60
2018
Chang Gung Memorial Hospital
2
Verification Protocol for The Cloud DX Vitaliti™ Continuous Vital Sign Monitor (CVSM): Non-invasive Blood Pressure Component for Clinical Use and Self Measurement According to the American Safety in Medical Technology and the IEEE
Blood Pressure
Vitaliti
78
2018
Population Health Research Institute
3
Post-Market Surveillance of the Wright Medical Technology Metal-on-Metal Total Hip System (FDA 522 Order)
Hip Disease, Hip Osteoarthritis, Joint Pain, Osteoarthritis, Hip
Wright Medical Technology Metal-on-Metal Total Hip System
255
2018
MicroPort Orthopedics Inc.
4
Pilot Study: Assessing Near Infrared Fluorescence Imaging Medical Technology for the Detection of Bladder Cancer
Bladder Cancer
Hexaminolevulinate HCL, Near Infrared Fluorescence (NIRF)
10
2017
University of Rochester
5
The Effects of Resourcefulness Training Intervention and Decentering on Self-Management of Stress in Caregivers of Children With Complex Chronic Conditions Dependent on Lifesaving Medical Technology: A Pilot Study
Caregiver, Chronic Illness, Gastrostomy, Mechanical Ventilation Pressure High, Mindfulness
Mindfulness, Resourcefulness Training
31
2017
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
6
Diabetic Foot Ulcer
Standard care, Surrosense
120
2016
University of Alberta
7
Influence of Light on Sleep, Awakening, Electroencephalogram (EEG) and Cognitive Performances, and Medical Technology Assessment for Registration and Long-term EEG Analysis
Human Sleep and Chronobiology
Application of white polychromatic light for 2h30 at different times of day
92
2016
University Hospital, Strasbourg, France
8
Opioid-related Disorders
Interim Buprenorphine Treatment (IBT)
70
2015
University of Vermont Medical Center
9
Examination and Treatment of Elderly After a Fall- an Analysis in a Medical Technology Evaluation Perspective
Accidental Falls
multifactorial intervention, Usual care
392
2005
Glostrup University Hospital, Copenhagen
10
A Pivotal Study to Evaluate the Safety and Effectiveness of RMT Medical Technology's SafeFlo® Vena Cava Filter
Pulmonary Embolism
SafeFlo IVC Filter
117
2003
RMT Medical Technologies, Ltd.

Use Cases

#TopicPaper TitleYearFields of studyCitationsUse CaseAuthors
1
Medical Technology
Can We Enhance Man’s Morality Using Medical Technology? – A Critical View from Buddhist Moral Perspective
2020
0
can we enhance man’s morality
2
Medical Technology
Photodynamic therapy as an up-to-date medical technology for the treatment of vulgar acne
2020
Medicine
1
the treatment of vulgar acne
3
Medical Technology
Elaboration of New Medical Technology for Predicting the Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease in the Workers of the Coal Industry
2019
Medicine
0
predicting the risk of ischemic heart disease in the workers of the coal industry
4
Medical Technology
HOUT-24. CHALLENGES AND SUCCESSES IN THE GLOBAL REIMBURSEMENT OF A BREAKTHROUGH MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY FOR TREATMENT OF GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME
2019
Political Science, Medicine
0
treatment of glioblastoma multiforme
5
Medical Technology
Project for Promotion of Medical Technology for Improvement of Maternal-Neonatal Health in Guatemala
2019
Political Science, Medicine
0
improvement of maternal-neonatal health in guatemala
6
Medical Technology
Competitive Conditions Affecting U.S. Exports of Medical Technology to Key Emerging Markets
2018
3
key emerging markets
7
Medical Technology
Designing medical technology for resilience: integrating health economics and human factors approaches
2018
Business, Medicine
30
resilience: integrating health economics and human factors approaches
8
Medical Technology
Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response to Marrow Toxic Agents
2018
Medicine
0
contingency response to marrow toxic agents
9
Medical Technology
Features of Building Business Strategy for Introducing Innovative Medical Technology to the Market
2018
Business
0
the market
10
Medical Technology
Train the Trainers: Medical Technology for the Sustainable Development of Africa
2018
Political Science, Computer Science, Economics
3
the sustainable development of africa

Case Studies

#TitleDescriptionPDFYearSource Ranking
1
Medical technology communications platform | Case Study
Feb 2, 2022 — ... a complete website refresh and the integration of an external competition portal within the site. View the site. KISS Communications.
no
2022
10
2
Case Study: Custom Cooling for Medical Device Technology
Nov 22, 2021 — This medical device cooling case study showcases the expertise of Kooltronic, Inc. engineers in supporting unique project requirements ...
no
2021
10
3
Edge Computing and IoT Technologies for Medical Applications
by R Kumar · 2021 — Edge Computing and IoT Technologies for Medical Applications: A Case Study on Healthcare Monitoring: 10.4018/978-1-7998-4873-8.ch013: Dynamic observation of ...
no
2021
210
4
Technology, Virtual Health, and the Electronic Medical Record
Dec 15, 2021 — 2021 Ivey Business School Foundation | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy · Ivey Business School - Western University. Loading.
no
2021
0
5
Case Study: Forefront Medical Technology Helps COVID-19 ...
Aug 13, 2020 — include product registration and CE marking; maintenance of the Device History Record (DHR) and technical file; biocompatibility testing; ...
yes
2020
0
6
Case Study: Forefront Medical Technology Helps COVID-19 ...
Mar 9, 2020 — Password: DOWNLOAD NOW. OR. Email me a one-time sign in link. Loading, Please Wait.. Thank you, Please click the link sent to your mail.
no
2020
20
7
Impact of Guidelines on the Diffusion of Medical Technology: A Case ...
September 24, 2020 Journal article Open Access. Impact of Guidelines on the Diffusion of Medical Technology: A Case Study of Cardiac Resynchronization ...
no
2020
300
8
Impact of Guidelines on the Diffusion of Medical Technology: A Case ...
September 24, 2020 Journal article Open Access. Impact of Guidelines on the Diffusion of Medical Technology: A Case Study of Cardiac Resynchronization ...
no
2020
300
9
UCT GSB teaching case study on medical technology ...
Sep 25, 2020 — UCT GSB teaching case study on medical technology company, Biotronik, wins top international award · Email · Print · PDF.
no
2020
60
10
Modern medical technologies in nursing observation of ...
Apr 10, 2019 — The study covered a 1.5-month-old infant who was hospitalised in the Clinic of Paediatrics, Endocrinology, and Diabetology in order to diagnose ...
no
2019
120

Experts

Twitter

#NameDescriptionFollowersFollowingLocation
1
Medical Reel
Medical Reel shares medical technology, research and education updates for all. Enjoy the Reel. #MedTech #MedEd
21 264
2 121
London, UK
2
AdvaMed
The leading voice for the medical technology community that provides life-changing innovations to millions of patients every day.
17 626
681
Washington, DC
3
sanesoendoscopy
Saneso is a US-based medical technology company headquartered in Pittsburgh, PA engaged in the development of next generation endoscope systems.
16 285
29
Pittsburgh, PA
4
MedTech Europe
The European trade association for the medical technology industry including diagnostics, medical devices and digital health. #medtech
15 609
1 841
Brussels
5
BD
Tweeting news and information about BD (Becton, Dickinson and Co.) - a leading global medical technology company. #bectondickinson #BD #BDX
12 422
706
Franklin Lakes, NJ
6
Kareo
We offer the only cloud-based and complete medical technology platform purpose-built to meet the unique needs of independent practices #GoKareo
11 931
10 381
Irvine, CA
7
Smith+Nephew USA
We are a leading portfolio medical technology company using technology to take the limits off living #LifeUnlimited
11 349
388
Andover - Memphis
8
HeartFlow
Medical technology company transforming the diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease. #HeartFlowAnalysis #FFRCT #CCTA #AI #heartcare
11 121
835
Redwood City, CA
9
Medtech Insight
Your number one source for global medical technology news. Follow for expert analysis, commentary and informed perspectives about the #medtech world
8 630
1 034
London, UK
10
Smith+Nephew
News from Smith+Nephew, global medical technology business. Please note: not all products referred to may be approved for use or available in all markets.
6 895
616
Watford, England

Quora Profiles

#NameAnswersFollowersLocationViewsTopicTopic LinkAnswers to topic
1
17482
1 515
University of Nebraska at Omaha
10 759 096
Medical Technology
17482
2
19
19
Birmingham, AL
42 640
Medical Technology
19
3
12
84
Santa Monica, CA
36 357
Medical Technology
12
4
257
13
12 289
Medical Technology
257
5
1
1
7 195
Medical Technology
1
6
27
5
Pennsylvania (state)
6 963
Medical Technology
27
7
8
118
New York City
6 119
Medical Technology
8
8
16
0
Oklahoma (state)
3 349
Medical Technology
16
9
2
47
2 384
Emergency Medical Technology
2
10
10
1
881
Medical Technology
10

Youtube Channels

#NameDescriptionReg DateViewsCountry
1
Hologic is an innovative medical technology company primarily focused on improving women’s health and well-being through early detection and treatment. We develop, market and service some of the most advanced diagnostic, medical imaging, surgical and medical aesthetic products on the planet. For more information, visit www.hologic.com.
Mon, 17 Dec 2007
142 185 513
United States
2
For more than half a century, UCLA Health System has provided the best in healthcare and the latest in medical technology to the people of Los Angeles and throughout the world. Comprised of Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica, Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital at UCLA, UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital, and the UCLA Medical Group with its wide-reaching system of primary-care and specialty-care offices throughout the region, UCLA Health System is among the most comprehensive and advanced healthcare systems in the world. Visit us at www.uclahealth.org
Tue, 25 Sep 2007
88 776 193
United States
3
For over 30 years, Bionix has been a leader in the development, manufacturing and marketing of innovative medical devices and equipment. Find videos about Bionix Medical Technologies, Bionix Health at Home, Bionix Radiation Therapy and National Safety Technologies.
Wed, 1 Apr 2009
14 273 803
United States
4
Over 30 years ago, the Silicon Valley Historical Association believed that society was going through a rapid period of technological change that would alter the lives of everyone on the planet— similar to the changes that took place during the Italian Renaissance period. We began filming high-tech entrepreneurs and inventors. We asked the interviewees about their beginnings, the struggles that they faced, their mentors, their lucky breaks, and their visions for the future. With their stories, we hope to educate the public about the unique people and supportive environment in Silicon Valley that has made it possible for many of the technological changes to take place that we are seeing in the world today — the computer, the Internet, genetic engineering and breakthrough medical technologies — just to name a few. Contact information: Email: [email protected] Phone: (650) 857-0765
Sat, 11 Oct 2008
7 353 376
United States
5
Shinagawa aims to become the provider of the best, safest, and latest medical technology in LASIK, Aesthetics, Cataract, and Orthodontics to our patients and clients in the Philippines and from other countries at affordable prices and with the highest quality of patient care. Experience life in HD and shine brighter with Shinagawa. Visit our website to know more about us! Schedule your appointment by calling our Patient Care Lines today. Landline: (+632) 7-368-5238 Globe: (+63) 917-862-7454 Smart: (+63) 921-217-0517 👁️✨💯
Wed, 20 Oct 2010
3 770 701
Philippines
6
Please call : +97143542905 or +971568771044 www.spectronixmedical.com Spectronix Group is one of the leading firms in UAE specializing in bringing some of the most advanced aesthetic and Medical technologies from round the globe to Middle East and India . The company has strong presence in the region and regularly organizes workshops training and is a one stop shop for aesthetic and medical technologies. Please call : +97143542905 or +971568771044 www.spectronixmedical.com
Fri, 14 Dec 2012
2 674 716
United Arab Emirates
7
ATMOS has a clear target: to prolong life and to sustainably improve the quality of peoples' lives. This results in further development and innovation: ATMOS deve­lops safe and easy to handle medical solutions which offer users of modern medical technology new ways and possibilities.
Sat, 31 Oct 2009
2 419 941
8
We'll make you tingle: Since 2005, we've been producing high class devices for erotic electro-stimulation -- and all kinds of toys to go along with. With our background in medical technology and a distinctive sense for good design, we have the know-how -- and the ambition -- to uphold the highest quality standards. www.mystim.com
Mon, 4 Nov 2013
1 497 147
9
Miele Profeesional. Immer Besser. Since its establishment in 1899, Miele has followed its brand promise “Forever Better,” developing machines which have set standards in terms of quality, technology, health and safety. Miele Professional has advanced to become innovation leader in high-performance cleaning and hygiene equipment including laundry technology, commercial washing machines and dishwashers, medical and dental instruments and laboratory equipment. No matter what your field - hotels, restaurants, facilities management, laboratory applications, dental surgery cleaning and disinfection, nursing homes or hospitals - Miele Professional offers tailored solutions for laundry technology, medical technology, commercial dishwashers and the cleaning of dental, medical and laboratory equipment.
Sun, 13 Jan 2013
1 208 792
Germany
10
Carolina Orthopaedic and Neurosurgical Associates (CONA) is a medical practice in SC providing orthopaedic, neurosurgery, and pain management services. With Spartanburg SC roots since 1962, our combined practice of orthopaedics and neurosurgery is comprised of expert board-certified physicians treating a range of conditions with the latest in medical technologies. The physicians of the newly-formed practice, Carolina Orthopaedic and Neurosurgical Associates (CONA), offer the most advanced training and experience in orthopaedic surgery, neurosurgery and pain management in the Upstate SC region. The practice offers a synergistic approach for the spine, skeletal system, nervous system and supporting structures, meaning total quality care for your optimal health!
Sun, 6 Jan 2019
1 076 544
United States